You may also like...

6 Responses

  1. Gregg says:

    Just wanted to say Hi and thanks for Cape Town…it is amazing how this is and has been an issue for me as well…in particular I am trying to reflect on Jesus’ 2 greatest commandments of which to love my neighbour as myself is the 2nd…there is no shortage of neighbouts but it is the working out of that, that is hard…
    Continue to work it out…
    Gregg

  2. steve martin says:

    The answer is ‘D’…all of the above.

    “But I don’t like my neighbor!”

    Therein lies the problem.

    In the cross, is contained the solution.

  3. criticaltc says:

    Isn’t this question waaay over thought (maybe that’s your point)? A neighbor is anyone God (IMO) put in our life. That may be the guy I brew beer with that I’ve known since I was 5, the guy who lives next to me with the annoying kids or the homeless person who asked me for money on the way into work; it’s whoever comes naturally in and/or out of our lives. I don’t think we need to look for our neighbor to love, rather love who’s in front of us at the moment.

    “In the cross, is contained the solution.”…something I was taught as a child that I never really grasped. I don’t see the wide disparity between people in Christ loving better than people outside of Christ. Is that what you were referring to, Steve, or did I misunderstand you? If you were, could you please explain how you see this played out in daily life? Thanks!

  4. steve martin says:

    criticaltc,

    You are absolutely right. Our neighbor is everyone in our path (our life).

    That we quite often would rather not go there, are too busy, have our own problems, etc. is the problem of the heart (the selfish attitude) that is our fallen state.

    The only solution for this human condition of not wanting to get outside our selves, of not wanting to live our lives as God intended us to live them (loving God and our neighbor as ourselves)…is the cross.

    The cross was God’s answer to a world that just wouldn’t have Him. He died and forgave them (us).

  5. criticaltc says:

    Steve, thanks for your response. Where the lines never connected for me (and I guess, still don’t) is in the statement,

    “The only solution for this human condition of not wanting to get outside our selves, of not wanting to live our lives as God intended us to live them (loving God and our neighbor as ourselves)…is the cross.”

    If this were the case, wouldn’t people outisde of Christ be unable to love their neighbors as themselves? From my experience, there are plenty of people who don’t accept the Cross who step outside their own selves on a daily basis to love others. I think of all the urban activists who work tirelessly to help disadvantaged children and the homeless population who are self-avowed atheists. I’m not demeaning the good of Christians who are motiviated by the cross as you describe, but what about the others?

  6. steve martin says:

    Nobody, Christians or not, loves God and their neighbors as themselves.

    The goodness required by God (revisit the Sermon on the Mount) is a goodness rooted in purity and perfection.

    We all love our neighbors to one degree or another and to whatever extent it happens, by anyone, is a good thing.

    But God is concerned about righteousness. The end game. Making things (and people), the way it was intended to be.

    So for our sakes, He was incarnate as a man, lived a perfect life, and was crucified. That we might, through faith, be made righteous and oure to spend an eternity with Him, the One who made us.

    Goodness on earth? To the extent that it happens, it will always get an ‘Amen!’ from me, no matter if it’s a Muslim, Hindu, Christian, or atheist that is doing it.

    Thanks, Criticaltc.