Gay Thursday: gay centered

gays are centered out

Needless to say, this is a tough position to be in. Adversarial. Hostile. Behind enemy lines.

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16 Responses

  1. Jacquie Kernick says:

    Looks like you’d need a “get out of jail free” card. Hemmed in on all sides, trapped. It’s good though that straight people can make a path through the obstruction/jail if they join together.

    I’m one of the straight people who is willing to stand aside to make the first chink in that almost inpenetrable wall we’ve created. I look for others to join me to loose the one trapped. My gay son broke free….yay!

  2. David Waters says:

    How about drop the labels? Or just make it human? Why does preference have to define and divide? We don’t do it with left/right handed.

  3. Carol says:

    The common primary purpose of genital sexuality is procreation. The human expression of genital sexuality includes a unitive function.

    Throughout human history the unitive function has been either sublimated to the procreative or neglected entirely.

    With the decrease in infant and childhood mortality and the extension of life expectancy by modern medical technology; perhaps the unitive function of genital sexuality will begin to be valued as much as or more than the procreative function. Until then the only safe place for gays and those who recognize their shared common humanity with heterosexuals will be in the closet.

    Some people value security over integrity of conscience. Others don’t even discern the conflict since the human conscience, like the human intellect is not infallible.

    There should be zero tolerance for predatory sexual behavior by either gays or straights; but freedom of conscience in all human choices where predatory advantage is not an issue, IMO.

    I sometimes suspect that anti-gay reactions are sometimes a diversion from heterosexual indulgence in pornography or aggressively predatory heterosexual behavior.

  4. Jpd7906 says:

    @David Waters
    It would be nice wouldn’t it? The problem is nobody is marginalized, demonized, condemned or denied legal equality based on their handedness. Labels become important for disadvantaged minority groups because they become our voice. They speak our truth and make our existance known. I have heard a lot of discussion lately about dropping these labels. I think it’s a great ideal. For it to happen, straight folks will have to make the first move and give up the privilege they have been accustomed to.

  5. Sabio Lantz says:

    Question: Am I the only one who has had to explain to work colleagues who happened to glance at my computer screen why my in-box is loaded with notes from “Naked Pastor“? Well, I guess it is a good opportunity to witness.

  6. Marty M says:

    One way to look at the cartoon is a gay person distanced and hemmed in by a horde of straight people.

    Another way to look at it, and the first way that came to my mind, is the (fearful) obsession with the topic of homosexuality by straight people.

  7. Janet says:

    I find it rather interesting that sometimes a person’s sexuality is more important than whether or not they know Christ.

  8. Cindy says:

    @David Waters
    I’d like to think we might get there some day, but this certainly isn’t it. Did you know that there was a time when being left-handed was considered evil? Even in more modern times there are people that consider it awkward though no longer evil and don’t want their kids to be left-handed. My oldest brother was/is left-handed but my parents wouldn’t let him use his left hand for things like eating and writing when he was just learning. So he grew up eating and writing with his right hand and seems right-handed to the casual observer, but if you watch closely, for things based solely on instinct and untrained he will still naturally use his left.

    @Marty M
    I find that fascinating. I think in many cases (though probably not all) those most obsessed are obsessed because they are repressing their own sexuality and are actually closet cases though perhaps so deep in denial that they don’t even see it themselves. Been there, done that.

    @Janet
    That’s because, sadly, for a large contingent of conservative Christians, you can’t be both gay and know Christ. If you really knew Christ he would set you free from your gayness so you could be “normal” and a real Christian because real Christians conform to some ideal since we were supposedly all created to be essentially the same…

  9. Marty M says:

    Another way to look at it is all the “straights” are looking outward and trying to hide the (emabarassing) fact that there is a gay person among them.

    Still another way to look at it (@ Cindy) is the panel is just one individual person in denial living a multi-layered straight facade.

  10. Dawson says:

    God does not make Gay DNA code mistakes.

    Siamese Twins are a “Lifestyle Choice”!

  11. Sabio Lantz says:

    @ Janet
    So, if someone doesn’t “know Christ”, then it is OK to judge them? If the “know Christ” then gays are OK. What about a gay person who doesn’t “know Christ” (whatever that means).

    Imagine David’s drawing with “Christian” written all around the pic but in the center is “Not Us”. Is that really different?

  12. Christine says:

    I saw the title before I saw the cartoon, so it hit me differently. Let me explain.

    One of the most useful terms in these discussions, in my opinion, is the term “heteronormative”. Put simply, it’s the assumption that being straight is the norm, the default, and everything else (QLBGTQII) is a deviation. This isn’t homophobia or bigotry – as it isn’t fear, hate or discrimination – it’s just an assumption.

    It’s the reason why people are assumed straight until they “come out” as being gay – as opposed to not having their sexual orientation presumed. To not be heteronormative would mean that when a man talked about his wife or a woman her husband, you would think “oh, so I guess they’re straight”.

    Heteronormative is why you don’t see gay couples in advertising when the product is for the general public. Or why you don’t usually see gay characters in TV or movies unless their sexual orientation is part of the plot – as opposed to simply representing the statistically probably number of gay people in any group.

    Another way to put this is that it’s hetero-centric, or straight centred. “Gay centred”, as a concept, would then be to invite people to imagine if it were the other way around. For gay people – what if you were seen to be the norm, if you were the majority? Everywhere you looked, everyone was gay. For straight people – what if suddenly everyone assumed you were gay until you corrected them, then made a big deal about you “coming out” or flaunting your sexuality? What if everywhere you looked, there were gay people and images of gay people, and the only straight characters in ads, TV and movies were there solely to point out and make a big deal of their sexuality? Suddenly, nothing is aimed at you or about you.

    We can be gay-centric – or, may I suggest, “homonormative” – even regardless of the numbers. (Maleness is often viewed and used as a default – especially with pronouns – despite there being more women than men.) And so I look at the cartoon and see the focus being on “gay”, gay being the centre, even in a sea of straight.

    For those of us who are in accepting environments, or certain social groups, this can actually be how we see the world. (I’ve had the “oh, so he’s straight” moment a view times.) It’s why one would purposefully seek out TV, movies, and novels with gay characters in central roles – to see ourselves represented in the world around us.

    And finally when I came out of the closet, I started to get things I just didn’t understand before. For example, why women were portrayed (in modern TV anyways) as being as interested in sex as men. I get it now, of course, but then I didn’t see why they would be so interested (I instinctively got what was in it for men) – it seemed fake to me. But now most popular media makes more sense. If something seems implausible, I think to myself “just imagine one of those people with a different gender” and then the appeal, the romance, the dynamics – they all suddenly make much more sense (even if it’s two guys, actually). “Coming out” was an “aha!” moment – and it was that because, as a lesbian, I am naturally gay-centred. It’s how the world makes sense to me. (As much as the world may sometimes try to have me eat with my other hand.)

    So, I didn’t see a threat at all. Instead, I saw myself, my worldview, in this cartoon.

    Thanks, David.

  13. Carol says:

    Not all societies are as polarized over gender identity as the European cultures.l

    Many Native American societies have recognized “two-spirited” people who express both masculine and feminine traits in their personalities. Genitial sexual expression is only part of this phenomenon and homosexuality may or may not be present.

  14. Trish says:

    Gay sex is sinful no matter how you slice it.

  15. nakedpastor says:

    Trish: Oh! That settles it then. Thanks.

  16. Harshan says:

    A kid does not commit suicide because he performed a homosexual act. A kid commits suicide because he fell in love with his best friend, and was ridiculed or bullied for being different.

    Heterosexuals, being obsessed with genitals, sex acts, and procreation, see gayness as an activity. Using their speculative voyeurism and lurid imagination, they make themselves experts about things they have never seen and about people they have never met.

    Gay people see gayness as an identity.

    A gay man can marry a woman and perform heterosexual sex acts with her, yet still be gay. A heterosexual man can go to prison and perform homosexual acts and still be heterosexual when he comes out. Sexuality is, despite its name, not about sexual activities, but about romantic attractions.