Pope Francis and what he proves

"Pope Francis" cartoon by nakedpastor David Hayward

“Pope Francis” cartoon by nakedpastor David Hayward

There’s not a doubt in my mind that Pope Francis is a truly amazing human being. I think he injects a refreshing energy, wisdom, and justice into the church and reminds us of what true religion can be.

I also have no doubt that he is painfully aware of the deadly mistakes the church has made, the injustices it now not only participates in but facilitates, the damage it has done and continues to perpetuate, and the changes that simply must occur.

There also can be no question that he must acknowledge his office’s historical collusion in it all.

Everyone knows that reform not only means change in the followers, but change in the organization and its leaders as well.

My hope is that we all would commit to this painful, necessary, and urgent process of change.

SHOP

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24 Responses

  1. Sue Bonner says:

    I truly respect and admire Pope Francis. I think he will be the catalyst for many positive changes in the Catholic church. He is also a great voice of conscience for the world.

    Too many of his critics complain that he has not already accomplished changes they would like to see. Please give the guy a break! In any institution change comes slowly.and the Catholic church is the oldest and largest institution ever invented. Things won’t happen overnight. Even though I’m not Catholic, as a lesbian I really wish that official Catholic doctrine didn’t state that being gay is “intrinsically disordered.” But for the Pope to say “who am I to judge” is a major improvement and a step in the right direction. I have full confidence that the Catholic church will get to the point of gay acceptance one of these days. Just don’t expect it to happen instantaneously.

  2. Bernardo says:

    “My hope is that we all would commit to this painful, necessary, and urgent process of change.”

    Let us begin:

    Francis noted: “Where would we be without you?” in addressing the nuns at St. Patrick’s cathedral: Hmmm, shall we count the ways nuns would profit by not be subject to theologically and historically flawed restrictions imposed by old white men:

    1. Better paying jobs
    2. Priesthood
    3. Positions in the RCC hierarchy
    4. The Papacy
    5. Equality

    Of course, one must ask why anyone would stay in such a way of life????

  3. Bernardo says:

    Oops, make that “would profit by not being subject…….”

  4. Headless Unicorn Guy says:

    Too many of his critics complain that he has not already accomplished changes they would like to see.

    Well, when the critics for the past fifty years have been playing the same three-note chord — Marry Priests, Ordain Women, and Same-Sex Marriage and nothing else…

  5. Well, I think we can all admit that the changes have been painfully slow. But how about essential change as is suggested here? Like the status of women. LGBTQ. Sexual abuse. Pederast priests.

  6. purvez says:

    David : ‘There also can be no question that he must acknowledge his office’s historical collusion in it all.’

    Just his office’s? No DIRECT blame? Gosh David you are STILL MARRIED to your ORIGINAL THEOLOGY!! I’m sad for that.

  7. I’m not sure purvez how you got out of my post that he doesn’t accept personal blame. You do realize that even the pope has his own confessor, which more than implies he must recognize his own faults. And when someone fills an office and the office is responsible, who in their right mind would excuse themselves as personally invested in it?

  8. purvez says:

    Now if you’d said that about John Paul II I would have been quietened.

  9. purvez says:

    Sorry David but that’s now how your post came across to me. You seemed to imply (obviously incorrectly in my understanding) that he was beyond reproach just his ‘history’ was questionable.

  10. seriously? i just read it again and i simply can’t see how i’ve excused the pope from personal responsibility. but then i wrote it.

  11. purvez says:

    David, I rarely get involved in personal accusations. Please may I suggest that YOU read your own post. All of the ‘accusations’ are in the third person.

    ‘I also have no doubt that he is painfully aware of the deadly mistakes the church has made, the injustices it now not only participates in but facilitates, the damage it has done and continues to perpetuate, and the changes that simply must occur.’

  12. I have read it. And I wrote it. I’m not being defensive. I’m just rather alarmed at your apparent overlooking of some other things I wrote, like:

    “There also can be no question that he must acknowledge his office’s historical collusion in it all,” and by office I mean the position and the one who fills it.

    Also,

    “Everyone knows that reform not only means change in the followers, but change in the organization and its leaders as well.” He is its leader.

    I suppose I could have been more clear, like “The pope is personally at fault for his own sins and the sins of the church” or something like that, but I think statements like this neglect the greater dynamic at work, and that is that the church is greater than the sum of its parts, and that the church can possess this power or be possessed by it. I have a sense that in the past the RCC has been possessed by this power, but that Pope Francis is trying to turn this around and bring the church’s power under possession.

  13. purvez says:

    David, all I was expecting was an acknowledgment that he was the head of an institution that had failed MANY. I am NOT saying : “The pope is personally at fault for his own sins and the sins of the church”. I have NO IDEA about his own sins but he is personally responsible for the sins of the church. Your post DID NOT point that out (to me at least).

  14. Again purvez, when you say “David, all I was expecting was an acknowledgment that he was the head of an institution that had failed MANY,” I feel I wrote exactly that. So we’re both baffled I suppose.

  15. purvez says:

    Just to lay this matter to rest. Your post holds ‘the church’, ‘his office’ and ‘it’ responsible for the offenses. No where does it say HE (the pope) was responsible. Perhaps it’s my ‘reading of your post’ that’s at fault.

    Thanks for the responses.

  16. Ducatihero says:

    “critical failures to repair and necessary reform to address” and change on followers, leaders and institutions.

    I could say I have failed, am in need of repair, reform and change. But then if that’s true for me, it’s also true for you. If true for the RCC, true for protestantism, and any other human organisation or ideological movement.

    I don’t think the problem is about religion and being ” religion free”. If going by British values religion is any religion or absence of religion. So looked on that way everyone is religious ( or not).

    What we get by separating into different groups is us and them tribalism. I don’t think that is the main issue but noise that distracts from the main issue.

    I think the main issues are our common humanity and what enables us to have life to the fullest or conversely is damaging to life.

    I agree, I think pop Francis is a good guy and he made steps forward with saying “who am I to judge”. I would suggest we need more like him an not just in the church but in all positions of influence – politics, the media etc. and the patient endurance for transformation in all areas of life.

  17. Hamsahandgirl says:

    I hope he can address more issues, too. But he is pushing the envelope and I see that as a good thing. I might still be a Catholic if he had become Pope after John Paul.

  18. Gary says:

    I have to admit…the more the man chooses the path of political activism the less and less I think of him. I was once a fan…not so much anymore.

  19. I’m not a “fan” either. I do have respect for him though. Do you believe political activism is beyond the scope of the pope?

  20. Gary says:

    Yeah I think I largely do. Especially when his views play almost exclusively into one party’s hand over the other. I also think many of the the views he tries to shame us into accepting are very naive and do not hold the moral high ground he seems to believe they do.

  21. Gary says:

    Ironically David, I see the pope as becoming the counterpoint to my old baptist preachers. It used to bug the hell out of me when they would promote and agenda that seemed to clearly enunciate that it was incompatible with the Christian faith to be a liberal. Even though I was clearly conservative, and still am on many issues, I recognized that people of good conscience can and do disagree on many of these issues. I am beginning to think the pope believes it is incompatible with the Christian faith to be a conservative. I am parts of both conservative and liberal and both views still annoy the hell out of me.

  22. Yes, I agree. Faith is not exclusive to one party. Although that seems to be what each party thinks.

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