Losing Spiritual Weight

"Losing Spiritual Weight" cartoon by nakedpastor David Hayward

“Losing Spiritual Weight” cartoon by nakedpastor David Hayward

ORDER A PRINT OF THIS CARTOON
There’s nothing wrong with symbols. As long as we recognize them as symbols.

Symbols can be useful. But we may reach a point where they become encumbrances.

Join us at The Lasting Supper where many of us are doing what this guy is doing in the cartoon!

SHOP

You may also like...

10 Responses

  1. Sabio Lantz says:

    All of us have so much bias-weight to lose, and yet the problem is, such weight loss usually offers little benefits.
    WHAT ! Truth should always be the answer — but unfortunately it isn’t.
    That is the problem.

    I think the religious baggage that needs to be dropped is not fed by some religious part of the brain but instead fed by our cognitive biases which feed much of our lives. These biases are the very same that gives us our politics, our racism, our sexism, our I’m-specialism and our efficiency and niches in life.

    Why do we have these biases? Well, they serve us well in many situations, just as religion serves people (true or not) in many situations. Understanding how biases serve us and what the biases are is key.

    We can’t escape our biases but we can understand their functions — both good and bad. I read this article today which makes much of this fantastically clear — so if anyone is interested, I give the link.

    It is good to understand our enemy, it is ourselves.

  2. Hey Sabio. Long post but worth the read.

  3. Jack Russell says:

    Ah yes “cognitive biases” so in that case any “religious baggage” being a symptom of such rather than the condition itself.

    Is anyone up for an Atkins diet? Or what is that one where you eat normally for 5 days then 500 calories a day for two? Or maybe just move more and eat less ;).

    So the enemy being ourselves that’s interesting and helpful, is it not, if the alternative is to put ourselves in some kind of status as a victim?

    Interesting to consider perhaps along with Freud’s ideas about the id, ego and superego. Or another approach that we all are naturally have attachment and aversion toward things which we both need for survival and at other times can be a hindrance to us if we allow.

    So in light of the cartoon yes encumbrances and symbols, chewing on the meat and spitting out the bones?

  4. Caryn LeMur says:

    So many things are ‘weights’ – the very Fish Symbol that helped me as a teen (and very large bible)… well, they just don’t help me now. Lol.

    Speaking honestly to another human being – that is something that has helped me tremendously. I think that is the core power of ‘confession’.

    Learning self-applause – that is also something that helps me tremendously.

    I imagine there may be a time when the new tools will become weights… but right now, they are wonderful. I guess we change as we grow older: “When I was a child, I thought as a child…”

  5. Hey Caryn: I thought of the putting away childish things verse, but I didn’t want to imply to others who are appreciating their religious symbols right now that they were being childish.

  6. Sabio Lantz says:

    I think “quoting scripture” is one of the many religiosity habits that is worth shedding, but obviously is one of the last to go.

    Quoting scripture = trying to add authority to your words or ideas with sources already questionable and human but considered “holy”. Trying to add sanctity to yourself or to manipulate others.

  7. Jack Russell says:

    Sabio, adding sanctity to yourself and manipulating others while quoting scripture for no other reason than to feel good about yourself, to try to be liked and earn status while looking superiour to others is never a good thing.

    Is that what Caryn was doing?

    Recently you virtue signalled by saying part of what your “God” is you being a good guy.

    So again, it must mean if you are good and there is evil around, it must mean that somone else is responsible for the evil, right?

  8. Caryn LeMur says:

    David: good point. I do not want someone that needs a tool – be it confession or church attendance or just plain old human friendship – to feel childish. Tools are tools. In my mind, they are neutrals.

    But oh… the right tool at the right time, is valuable indeed… lol. As I learned when a ‘spark arrestor muffler’ (?) flew off my chain saw, and required that weird star shaped long screw driver from the parts man. With that tool, I could reattach the piece (when the damn arrestor and engine cooled down, that is). 😉

    Hot metal is not fun to work with….

  9. Caryn LeMur says:

    Sabio: my apology to you if somehow, I appeared to be ‘sanctifying myself’ or ‘manipulating others’.

    Quoting an authority that pertains to the subject at hand, is, imo, a normal part of discussion.

    You, of course, believe there is no God, and therefore any ‘scripture’ has no more authority than any other writing by any human being.

    I quite differ … but you know that.

    So, I will quote the Bible when it pertains to the discussion at hand, as I wish.

    And indeed, I noticed you quote the Bible when it pertains to the discussion at hand.

    I quote the Bible as an authority; while you quote it to show otherwise.

    It is all quite ok in my book… it is all part of discussion.

  10. yes. tools. handy to get a job done. when needed.

Daily Cartoon & Reflection!

PLUS: Sign up & get my FREE eBook "Two Sizes Too Small"!