You may also like...

5 Responses

  1. Brad Jersak says:

    I’m not optimistic about a way out of this cycle: this brilliant graphing of the cycle shows it for what it is: the broad way that leads nowhere but round and round–i.e. destruction. The default mode of the broad way is to refuse the narrow way, which Christ defined as the golden rule of empathetic mercy (see the context in the Sermon on the Mount). Few are those who find the narrow way out or even want to. The cycle is marked by othering and exclusion at *every* stage change, defining ourselves over against the last square we inhabited and reviling those who haven’t yet been awakened to our new space of supposed arrival. David Hayward has diagnosed the problem. Jesus gave the prognosis. Still, repentance is possible, even if it’s like a fish trying to repent of water. I don’t claim to have escaped the cycle, nor do I see a whole lot of role models who have, but naming it so we can see it is both a beginning and an invitation. Thanks so much, David.

  2. I like the word “repentance” (except for all the religious baggage it now carries unfortunately)… as in turning a 180 away from evil… this is what I mean by “break the cycle” by turning away from it and living out a new way of being. Thanks Brad!

  3. Jack Russell says:

    How about dismissing that part of religion that is about control, being open to there being a positive side to “religion” as well as a negative and seeing it in it’s purest as caring for the vulnerable, and keeping from being polluted by evil and leading to life in the fullest.

    And in that sense “religion” including the golden rule of treating others as you would like to be treated, of embracing the beatitudes as Brad beautifully spoke of and regarding all in our truest sense as created in the image of God and good, loving and being loved, connected and in alignment with something bigger than ourselves as individuals or tribes.

    You may say I’m a dreamer, but I’m not the only one. I feel a song coming on 😉

  4. Raymond Griffith says:

    5 ages. Include the Age of Responsibility. Instead of turning to evil, we define our own moral code and live with the welfare of others in mind. We are not unrestrained, we have Grown Up and can exercise self-control.

    Funny, isn’t it? A “fruit of the spirit” unobtainable to those in religion but able to be exercised by those who break the chains?

  5. Hm. Good point. I don’t think it’s unattainable to those in religion, or those out of it. No one has an advantage. It takes great effort to personally break this cycle, and even more so socially. IMO.