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14 Responses

  1. Brigitte says:

    Did the little devil start before they said grace? What should they all do? Should they all stop giving thanks because there is no God and everything comes from evolution. Should they stop saying grace so the unbeliever is no offended?–Did you know that in Downton Abbey series, the aristocrats always sit at dinner, but they are never shown starting a meal? This is because the producers are trying to be very period correct and authentic, and the family would have definitely said grace, but they don’t want to have it in the show.

    I get together with two particular women friends, regularly. One has gone from German Lutheran, to married Roman Catholic, to dropping out. Now the family gets really attached to all the latest conspiracy theories, and last time I was over there, I saw Notradamus sitting on the side table. — when we get together we give thanks and hold hands and she never objects, though you can tell she nearly went ahead without waiting for us. It is not very awkward as we know each other well and have been close confidants for a long time.

  2. You seem very angry and resentful Brigitte that Christianity is no longer king. I could be wrong, but that’s the impression I get.

  3. Brigitte says:

    You have taken to calling people adjectives based on what you think they seem.

    What part of the statement “seems” angry to you?

  4. Brigitte says:

    How do you think people should cope at the family dinner table, would you suggest? I was looking for your plan for this eventuality.

  5. I don’t have a plan, except keep eating like this one is.

    You seem angry… and I could be wrong… because your sarcasm sounds like it. Again… I could be wrong. And I’m not judging you if you are angry.

    The truth is, Christianity IS no longer king. That’s difficult for many of us to accept and adjust to.

  6. Brigitte says:

    This cartoon is about who is king? I missed that. Is it about the patriarchy? As a person who cooks for and organizes get-togethers, it seemed to me to be about how they will go about giving thanks. Should the person who has deconstructed sit silently, object, fume or start an argument? That is the question raised in my mind.

  7. No… it’s about a person who has perhaps stopped going to church, changed their beliefs, and is now demonized by his family.

  8. Brigitte says:

    There are people who shun and kill for that sort of thing. So if they can still eat together, the “demonization” has not gone totally too far. Eating together is a sign of acceptance. There might be an argument, but ideally not over dinner or on a holiday. Still arguments tend to erupt over big meals and plenty of wine… some of these leave deep wounds and scars. So my question still is, whether the one who has stopped going to church will deliberately be the “devils advocate” to all the benighted people who still go to church. He can also cause deep wounds. It works both ways, when there is a divide and differences of opinion and belief.

  9. Yes that’s true. I know some people who were raised by atheist parents who now are “spiritual” and are treated differently. But that’s far more rare than the other way, which happens a LOT.

  10. Caryn LeMur says:

    In answer to Brigitte’s question, this is my technique: “Tell me about your philosophy, I would love to hear more.”

    The question is probably one of the greatest gifts a person can give to someone at the dinner table.

    Then, I just go silent, and let them talk. The speaker is normally defensive, awkward, and then… they smile, and tell me so much.

    I learn about their heart. I allow everyone to comment, and no one to attack.

    Friendships are then deeper, as each person continues along their philosophical journey. And… the lines of communication stay open. And that latter statement is the goal.

  11. Brigitte says:

    Yes. Listening is always good. But sometimes bland. I go to a writing meeting where people share something they have written, comment is encouraged, but only positive comments are allowed. I suppose it is a good first step for people who don’t know each other that well, otherwise, they won’t come out of their shells. It’s a good rule for family gatherings. I should institute it at ours. We mostly all go to church but disagreements are more along the conspiracy theory kind of thing. Strange, how that came out twice out of me in this thread regarding conspiracies. People are getting really paranoid. There is a lot of anxiety these days.

  12. Agreed Brigitte, there certainly is a lot of anxiety.

  13. Randy says:

    David, after all these years, you are still a genius. I have just recently started visiting your web page again after neglecting it for a few years. Your insight and wit are still amazing. My gosh man!

  14. Thanks Randy. Nice to see you again!